Comics With Kenobi #45

It’s a pair of powerful stories as both Marvel and IDW Publishing’s Star Wars comics deliver potent writing that ties into ongoing events in Star Wars: Rebels and builds a bridge to Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Writers Kieron Gillen and Devin Grayson have penned separate yet equally weighted missives on on what it means to lead and be led in the pages of Star Wars #42 and Star Wars: Forces of Destiny — Hera.

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Marvel Star Wars Comics Review: Star Wars #42

This review of Star Wars #42 contains minor spoilers.

The undercurrent of leadership and sacrifice is rife through the penultimate chapter of the “Ashes of Jedha” arc that is Star Wars #42.

This is storytelling by writer Kieron Gillen that’s quickly approaching legendary status, diving as it does into the concepts of self, group and alliance not just for Luke and Leia, but Han, too, as he grapples with reconciling the notion of being an authority figure with his ingrained identity as rogue and scoundrel.

It’s also a respectful, if not deeply emotional, nod to those who fell in pursuit of lofty goals and ideals, name Rogue One. To have the team mentioned in this issue, by Luke to the Partisans’ Ubin, is a punch to the gut, but also a harbinger of contentment, as we know that team’s sacrifice is not merely the stuff of Rebellion legend, but of Rebellion conscience, too.

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Comics With Kenobi #42

IDW Publishing makes a strong debut with the first of its five-issue Star Wars: Forces of Destiny series, while in the pages of Marvel’s flagship Star Wars monthly, Luke Skywalker’s bright light dims as he tackles a very real vestige of the dark side on the Jedha moon in issue 41 of Star Wars.

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Marvel Star Wars Comics Review: Star Wars #41

This review of Star Wars #41 contains minor spoilers.

For Luke, the light side dimmed toward darkness.

The religious overtones that underline Star Wars #41 aren’t subtle, but unsettling. Kieron Gillen’s words fold the time and space of the Saga that we, as readers, already know.

In doing so, Gillen’s examination of the vagueries and expectations of faith — that which one believes isn’t necessarily truth — presents Luke Skywalker with a challenge to his malleable optimism about the Force and what he needs.

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Marvel Star Wars Comics Review: Star Wars #40

This review of Star Wars #40 contains minor spoilers.

Marvel’s flagship Star Wars comic is picking up its pace amid the current story arc, threading together events from Rogue One: A Star Wars Story while adding more layers to the complex nature of the Rebellion.

Within the pages of the current issue, written by Kieron Gillen, drawn by Salvador Larroca, colored by GURU-eFX, lettered by VC’s Clayton Cowles and edited by Heather Antos and Jordan D. White, Luke, Leia and Han, along with R2-D2 and C-3PO, are drawn deeper into the tenuous moral fabric that envelops the survivors of Saw Gerrara’s Partisans on the moon of Jedha.

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Marvel Star Wars Comics Review: Star Wars #39

This review of Star Wars #39 contains minor spoilers.

The damage on Jedha looked bad from above the moon. It’s even worse on it.

As the “Ashes of Jedha” arc continues through Marvel’s flagship monthly Star Wars title, writer Kieron Gillen and artist Salvador Larroca have stocked #39 with a mix of powerful prose and imagery, along with some much-needed yet not over-the-top levity.

Indeed, the crux of the second part of this story arc is the admission of damage done to the moon during the events of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. While viewers saw the roiling rock and dirt and rising spire of dust, debris and death, it’s in the pages of the comic that we see its toll on those residents left behind and Saw Gerrera’s surviving Partisans.

It’s not pretty. It’s not hopeful. It’s not optimistic.

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Marvel Star Wars Comics Review: Star Wars #38

This review of Star Wars #38 contains minor spoilers.

There’s more to Jedha than we thought we knew.

It’s clear that the planet featured in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is far more than just a checkmark on planets the Empire has reduced to rubble.

Writer Kieron Gillen, who takes over Marvel’s flagship monthly, marks his debut with a wildly engaging romp that bridges not just Rogue One and Star Wars Rebels, but the endpoint of the original trilogy, too.

In short, Luke, Leia, Han and Sana — but not Chewbacca — find themselves seeking out the remnants of Saw Gerrera’s partisans, whom we last saw furiously fleeing the rolling devastation of earth, concussive force and and dust of the Empire’s “statement.”

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Marvel Star Wars Comics January Solicits

 

January’s Star Wars comics offer a peek into the life of Star Wars: The Last Jedi character DJ, the mystery man played by Benicio Del Toro.

There’s a conclusion, too, in the showdown between Darth Vader and Jocasta Nu.

While in not one, but two, issues of Star Wars, the ashes of Jedha are stoked as the fire burns within Luke Skywalker.

Doctor Aphra finds herself neck deep in trouble, again, as a familiar face may lend a helping hand or, perhaps, a swift kick.

While in the pages of Poe Dameron, Gen. Leia Organa and Black Squadron find themselves stymied in their crucial search for Lor San Tekka on a covert and dangerous mission to Cato Neimoidia.

Read on to find out more about January’s six Marvel Star Wars comics, including creative teams and more.

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Marvel Star Wars Comics Review: Star Wars #37

This review of Star Wars #37 contains minor spoilers.

Jason Aaron could have ended his tenure writing Marvel’s flagship Star Wars series with a burst of frenetic energy and action signifying nothing more than immediate gratification.

Instead, he concluded his adventuresome run with a big bang of swirling violence, darkly driven characters and above all, new beginnings.

There’s no doubting Aaron’s prowess as a story teller. It’s on display in this final outing — only temporary, we hope — both in in the main story and the stellar backup that brings readers another tale from Obi-Wan Kenobi’s Tatooine daries.

Despite the orgy of violence in the first story, it’s ultimately a tale of hope and redemption, leaping off the pages starting with the cover by Mike Mayhew.

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Marvel Star Wars Comics Review: Star Wars #36

This review of Star Wars #36 contains minor spoilers.

There’s a certain dynamic between R2-D2 and C-3PO that we may never truly understand and that’s fine because some mysteries ought to be just that, always.

Yet, in the pages of Star Wars #36, we get a glimmer of that relationship, but in a way that doesn’t overpower the duo’s individual strengths.

This issue brings to a conclusion, nearly a year later, the events of writer Jason Aaron’s “Last Flight of the Harbinger” story arc that ended in Star Wars #25 with C-3PO captured by the Empire.

While Goldenrod isn’t forgotten — he’s just not a high priority — it’s R2-D2 who takes the lead in a one-droid effort to not just free his log-standing partner, but perhaps strike a mortal blow to Darth Vader, too.

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