Book Review: Narrative Equality in Star Wars Galactic Maps

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Narrative Equality in Star Wars Galactic Maps

Please note, the following article has mild spoilers for several Star Wars canon books and comics, including but not limited to Darth Maul: Son of Dathomir, Lords of the Sith, Lost Stars, and Shattered Empire.

The excitement around new Star Wars narratives seems in direct proportion to the narrative weight that we as fans give those stories. A new Star Wars film is typically seen as the pinnacle of storytelling, with the animated television shows coming behind, also with a lot of excitement and media coverage. New novels are a milestone in their own right while comics fizzle in and out. Short stories often find themselves lacking coverage and reference books rarely make a dent. But… entertain me for a minute, as we explore how a particular reference book, Star Wars Galactic Maps by Emil Fortune and Tim McDonagh, a brand new “Illustrated Atlas of the Star Wars Universe,” brings to light elements from all these mediums in one single printed history of the galaxy, providing some narrative equality across all storytelling vehicles.

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Book Review: Rogue Genius: The Legacy of George Lucas

Book Review:

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‘Rogue Genius’

The Legacy of George Lucas

By David Childers

“George Lucas built an empire out of his imagination, yet critics have challenged his accomplishments.” – David Childers

Synopsis:

David Childers’ Rogue One: The Legacy of George Lucas takes you on a literary-cinematic journey through the challenges and accomplishments of “The Maker” himself, George Lucas. Not only does Childers explore Lucas’ creative career evolvement, but he also questions Lucas’ choices along the way as he investigates each one, through a journalistic-critical lens that applies a series of scrutinized research. In other words, Childers leaves no stone unturned or in this case, gelatin emulsion coating from a sheet of transparent plastic film.

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E.K. Johnston’s “Ahsoka” Novel Review – Spoilers!

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E.K. Johnston’s Star Wars: Ahsoka, on sale today, begins following the adventures of the Togrutan Force user exactly one year after the establishment of the Galactic Empire. This Young Adult novel is intended for ages 12-18 and grades 7-12. However, this 40-year-old reviewer loved the book, mainly due to my unashamed love of Ahsoka Tano and The Clone Wars. Here are some of the highlights. Beware – spoilers follow!

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Star Wars: Complete Locations Review

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I don’t know about you, but I have been waiting for this book to come out since I heard about its release.  Since the establishment of the canon, all of our old galactic atlases and planet information had to be taken with a grain of salt, as we were not quite sure what was still held as Star Wars fact.  Well, the wait is over, and it did not disappoint, as Star Wars: Complete Locations has arrived.

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Audiobook Review: Aftermath: Life Debt

Life Debt

Fortunately for me, Dan Z has provided a wonderful review of Chuck Wendig’s Aftermath: Life Debt, which you can read here. That leaves my task at hand to discuss Marc Thompson’s reading of this novel and the production value of the audiobook itself. In full disclosure, I have not listened to an audiobook in many years, so this was a wonderful treat to be able to experience the medium at its finest.

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The Force Awakens: The Visual Dictionary Review

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With the release of The Force Awakens on December 18th we were not only treated to a wonderfully amazing film but also a full cavalcade of literature as well. From story books such as Before the Awakening, to massively beautiful pieces like The Art of The Force Awakens and the chock full of information The Force Awakens: The Visual Dictionary. Let’s take a deep dive, shall we!

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BOOK REVIEW: The Dharma of Star Wars

BOOK REVIEW:

The Dharma of Star Wars by Matthew Bortolin
The Dharma of Star Wars by Matthew Bortolin

THE DHARMA OF STAR WARS

By Matthew Bortolin

Synopsis:

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away … Yoda was a Zen Master?

The Dharma is the Buddhist tutelage that guides you throughout the truisms of life’s realisms. Basically, it’s a compass that directs you along the path towards the truth of reality, in other words, real life.

Now combine that belief with George Lucas’s stories of the Hero’s Journey from Star Wars and ascend, all over again, across the stars of a galaxy far, far away in a whole new light.  An enriching and enlightening take on the holy saga, from A New Hope and through the darkness of Revenge of the Sith; a periscope view from a spiritual standpoint.

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Star Wars Book Review — Battlefront: Twilight Company

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Star Wars Battlefront: Twilight Company by Alexander Freed

Book Review by Mediocre Jedi

This review contains mild spoilers.

Alexander Freed’s Battlefront: Twilight Company, on sale today, centers on the soldiers of the Rebel Alliance’s Sixty-First Mobile Infantry on their planet-hopping operation in support of larger post-Battle of Yavin strategic movements.  Freed’s first novel is a tie-in to the upcoming Battlefront video game and will surely serve as a delicious appetizer for those fans awaiting the game. Largely devoid of Force users or starfighter combat, the book focuses more on the more practical aspects of military science fiction.

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Jeff McGee Reviews Star Wars FAQ by Mark Clark

Star Wars FAQ

When I volunteered to review Star Wars FAQ, written by Mark Clark and published by Applause books, I was expecting some fairly light reading in a Q and A format. What I read was an impressively dense tome that purports to serve as “One-Stop-Shopping” for the history of everything Star Wars, beginning with a brief biography of George Lucas up to the time he made Star Wars, and continuing until the release of the films on blu-ray disc. The full title of the book is Star Wars FAQ: Everything Left To Know About The Trilogy That Changed The Movies. This title is fairly accurate inasmuch as I cannot think of a major detail that was forgotten about the original trilogy. The author focuses mainly on the first three films, giving very little space to the prequels. There is quite a bit of time spent on the Ewok television movies, as well as the Droids and Ewoks cartoon series, so the title may be a bit of a misnomer in that regard, but I feel like the title squarely aims the book at those fans who appreciate everything produced in the 70s and 80s, so the inclusion of this information is more than welcome. However, there are a few passages that feel a bit out-of-place given the stated purpose of the book as a collection of historical items.

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Rogues Report Book Review: Star Wars FAQ

Rogues Report

There have been a lot of books written about Star Wars and the stories surrounding its near-legendary genesis have been retold countless times, but as the franchise nears its 40th anniversary, a new wave of nostalgia is rising and for many fans there is a longing to return to a simpler time. The undeniable legacy of the original trilogy stirs something within many of us and Mark Clark’s Star Wars FAQ is absolutely designed to tap into that communal feeling.

Star Wars FAQ

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